Palliative care

The main medical indications for hospitalization of patients in the palliative care department: Incurable progressive diseases requiring round-the-clock supportive care and nursing care: - various forms of malignant neoplasms; - severe organ failure in a stable condition of the patient (cerebrovascular insufficiency, chronic heart failure, respiratory failure, chronic renal failure, hepatocellular insufficiency) with partial or complete loss of the ability to self-service; - chronic progressive diseases of the therapeutic profile of a severe course or in the terminal stage (uncorrectable or poorly amenable to correction) with a stable condition of the patient with partial or complete loss of the ability to self-service; Irreversible severe consequences of diseases and injuries of the central and peripheral nervous system, acute and chronic cerebrovascular accidents in the presence of motor disorders (paresis, paralysis), low rehabilitation potential, accompanied by limitations of life and mobility of varying degrees, requiring round-the-clock supportive treatment and nursing care. · Irreversible consequences of injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system, accompanied by limitations of life and mobility of varying degrees with partial or complete loss of the ability to self-service and requiring round-the-clock nursing care. Other diseases (conditions) accompanied by various degrees of disability and mobility and requiring round-the-clock supportive treatment and (or) nursing care in the absence of medical indications for round-the-clock medical supervision: - cerebrovascular and degenerative diseases of the nervous system in the late stages of development; - senile asthenia; People suffering from oncological and other incurable progressive diseases need special care that combines medical, psychological and social assistance. Often, after treatment for one reason or another turns out to be ineffective, a person is left alone with his problem. Relatives of such a patient also often do not know how to improve the quality of his life, how to help him cope with fears and relieve pain. Professional palliative care for seriously ill patients has a positive impact on various aspects of the life of the patient himself and his loved ones. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as an approach that aims to improve the quality of life of a patient and family members facing a life-threatening illness. The goal is achieved through the alleviation and prevention of suffering, which includes the early detection, assessment and relief of pain and other painful symptoms, as well as the provision of psychological, social and spiritual assistance. Thus, palliative care consists of two components. The first is to alleviate the suffering of the patient throughout the entire period of the disease (along with radical treatment); the second is medical assistance in the last months, days and hours of life. Palliative care should be provided to all patients without exception with an unfavorable prognosis for life. The aim of palliative care is to provide the best possible quality of life for the patient. Death in this case is seen as a natural process. Palliative care has no intention of delaying or hastening its onset.

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